Giro Feather Helmet Review

giro feather helmet

At A Glance

A stylish endure helmet meets the female touch with the Feather from Giro! Based on the men’s Feature Helmet the Feather utilizes the same In-Mold polycarbonate shell to offer a lighter and safer construction. It’s a low-profile design with the In Form fit system as standard. Available in two sizes, S for 51-55cm heads and M for 55-59cm, there is a simple roller dial at the back to adjust the fit. With three color options that are not overtly pink or covered in rainbows, it’s a stylish and subtle female offering. The moto-style visor is adjustable which is a nice touch, and the interior padding is removable for easy cleaning.

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Bontrager Lithos Helmet Review

At A Glance

The Lithos from Bontrager is a new helmet for them this year, aimed firmly at the trail riders and all mountain enthusiasts it adds to their already impressive collection of XC and road orientated lids. It features an In-Mold composite skeleton, which enabled the team to put plenty of vents into the lid without losing strength. The adjustment for fit is controlled by the “Micro-Manager” which is a twist wheel system at the back of the helmet.

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Easton Havoc Handlebar 35mm Review

Easton has long been an industry leader as far as handlebars go. They were one of the early adopters of carbon too and if you’ve been riding a while you will no doubt have gripped into an Easton bar at some point in your life. The Havoc was the leading DH carbon bar on the market for a while and Easton has just stepped up the game with this 35mm offering.

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Trek Remedy 9.8 In Depth Review

At A Glance

The Remedy has been in the line-up at Trek for some time now, billed as the ultimate technical trail bike it has undergone a few guises over the years. In 2013 it was a 150mm 26″ wheeled machine that could eat up a lot more than one might expect. For 2014 the range has been split in two in order encompass two different wheel sizes. There is now a 29″ version and also a 27.5″ version, with 27.5″being very much in vogue at the moment we felt this was a good place to start with the Remedy range, we’ll be testing the 29″ version later in the year.

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Giant Trance 27.5 Ridden & Reviewed

After some extensive wheel size analysis, Giant has declared itself sold on 650b, with 29ers and 26in bikes taking a backseat in its 2014 line-up.

Spearheading the new direction is a range of reinvented low-slung Trance 650b bikes, where the 1is the top-end aluminum option. In addition to the change of wheel size, travel has jumped up from 127mm to 140mm, so even though Giant has dropped the X tag, the Trance packs more punch than ever before.

The swoopy, hydroformed frame gets a much more relaxed head angle for better high-speed stability(66.3°) and this, combined with the long back-end, means the Trance is easily the longest bike in the test, with a whopping 1,180mm wheelbase on the size Large.

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Santa Cruz Bronson C Review

At A Glance

The Santa Cruz Bronson is probably the most talked about the bike on the planet right now. Launched with a huge fanfare, and having the likes of Steve Pete and Cedric Gracia sing its virtues, it created an internet buzz that we haven’t seen for a while. Pre-orders stacked up and for a while, the bikes were as rare as rocking horse sh!t as the team in California struggled to keep up with the huge demand!

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Kona Process 134 Review

The process was well received as a 26in bike in 2013, but Kona has ripped up the rulebook and designed a brand new range comprising two longer-travel 650b bikes and one short-travel 29er. The Process 134 is the middle option, offering just over five inches of travel – 134mm, to be precise.

Kona’s new 650b –specific aluminum chassis, with its burly construction, would put many DH bikes to shame. The shape and geometry are very new-school. Using a steepest-on-test head angle, long front center, stubby stem and ultra-short chainstays, Kona relies on the extra length in the wheelbase for stability.

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We test the Pivot Mach 6 Carbon

At A Glance

Chris Cocalis and the team at Pivot have been working on this new 27.5 bike for the last two years. Since the launch of the Pivot Mach 5.7, it has arguably been one of the most anticipated bikes they have launched. We’ve seen it and drooled at shows, and even swung a leg over it in a car park. When the box arrived and it was finally ours to get properly muddy we were pretty excited!

It’s based on a DW Link suspension platform and has a specially tuned rear shock from Fox that has been a designed to offer the bike the utmost performance possible. With 155 of the rear wheel travel, it’s been billed as the ultimate enduro bike, needless to say, we were keen to find out if it was.

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We test the Pivot Mach 5.7 Carbon – What a ride!

Out on the trail, the character of this bike is defined clearly by the DW-link suspension. It’s a short-link-four-bar system that utilizes drive chain forces to provide ‘anti-squat’. In basic terms, when you load up the pedals, the chain pulls back against the swing arm and stiffens the suspension slightly to resist unwanted bob. Pedal harder when climbing and the suspension stiffens even more. The suspension is free to move when descending or pedaling along the flat. The anti-squat is used by almost every modern suspension design but in the DW-link this force is even more prevalent. Even compared to the VPP-2 short link-four bar systems used by Santa Cruz and Intense, the Pivot has more anti-squat! This means the suspension can be soft and free to soak up terrain due to the strong anti=squat characteristics.

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